PanZoe

PanZoe’s Primary Beneficiaries

Perhaps one of the key questions about PanZoe is how we assess which patients are best-suited for our services.  Although it could be argued that DPC works for everyone regardless of circumstance, PanZoe’s mission is to provide care to those underserved by our healthcare system.  Our three main targets are the elderly, the uninsured, and the working poor.

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Why is DPC Important

Anyone who has ever been to the ER or had an extended stay in the hospital can personally understand the need for cost ­effective medicine. Even with high­quality insurance, the financial impact on the average person can be absolutely devastating. With these challenges in funding life­saving situations, why would a doctor with decades of experience in medicine found a nonprofit dedicated to defraying the cost of primary care? Surely annual flu shots and treating occasional sniffles are not worthy endeavors when compared to surgeries and hospitalizations, right? Think again. Continue Reading



What’s in a Name?

“What’s in a name? That which we call a rose

By any other name would smell as sweet.”

By: Jillian Walsh

Although these immortal lines from Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet serve as an important reminder to put aside prejudices, Juliet is ignoring that names still carry great significance.   It seems to be a primary role as a human being to name or rename, ascribing meaning as we go.  Couples expecting a baby take time to consider the perfect name for their child.  Whether they are striving for a way to honor a person important to them, or looking for originality, or choosing a name because of its timelessness, these matters are not taken lightly.  This is also true in the world of business, where nomenclature becomes a brand, a guarantee, or a household name.

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Direct Primary Care and the Working Poor

Working Poor

Working Poor

One of the easiest vulnerabilities to spot in healthcare after the Accountable care Act are those individuals who simply cannot afford their deductibles. The insurance mandate in Obamacare leads those who work low wage jobs without benefits to buy the cheapest policies.

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MEASLES AND THE UPCOMING OUTBREAK

The following article was published April 2, 2014 as a guest editorial in the Oregonian and can be found on Oregon Live here. Today, we can say the North American measles epidemic is in full swing. We are just waiting for the body count, a comment the Oregonian in their wisdom elected to remove from my submitted draft. 
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REVOLUTION OR EVOLUTION

I resurrected this old blog post because it reflects some of the most basic and fundamental issues that were not addressed by the ACA. It is as current today as in 2008. Changes in health technology, consumer-facing health tools, payment reform and Meaningful Use have not moved the needle on establishing a unified view on the the nature and purpose of health care systems in general.
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EMPLOYED PHYSICIANS

This old post is here because I have been thinking a lot lately about the impact of employed physicians on a community’s health. Since this post was written, I have worked for a large hospital-based primary care practice where I was being pressured to produce referrals and tests. When I left, the company waived any non-compete clauses. If they had elected to enforce them, my current community would have been deprived of a family physician in an area of primary care penury. So the lack of independence in primary care may lead to overuse of specialty and technological services and deprive communities of the specific function (primary care) that makes health systems more efficient. This 2008 post contains the seed of an idea to develop a sustainable business model for the independent primary care physician in the interests of the public health. But there are several steps I will have to fill in, so stay tuned. Meanwhile, enjoy…
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